Stone Guide - Minerals Kingdom
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Choose your virtues and find the stone you need...

Whether physical, mental or emotional, find them all thanks to our guide: the minerals you need !

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agate stone

Agate

What is known today as agate stone comes from the Achates River in Sicily. In the ancient period, several civilisations (such as the Celts, the Mesopotamians, the Egyptians, etc…) exploited this stone for its properties but also for its natural beauty.
alexandrite stone

Alexandrite

In many cultures and civilizations, Moss Agate stone is a sign of soil fertility. Bringing good omens, close to nature, it extends its great generosity to the earth. This closeness to breeding ground is probably due to the crystallization of moss, its particular, fibrous and vegetal veining. It is the friend of gardeners and farmers. The great Athena owes its stability and balance to Moss Agate.
amazonite stone

Amazonite

Amazonite stone takes its name from the Amazon River where it was discovered. This green stone was honoured by Amazonian warriors and symbolises courage. However, some studies refute this analysis as it is likely that amazonite never existed in this river and it was simply a confusion with another mineral.
amber stone

Amber

The history of amber stone began almost 45 million years ago, between Central and Northern Europe’s amber-plentiful forests, ranging from the Caspian Sea to the Norwegian coast. It was not discovered until much later when it was commercialised to distant countries via the amber road.
amethyst stone

Amethyst

Originally used as an ornamental stone, amethyst stone was first mined for decorative ends by Etruscans and Egyptians. It was also used throughout the 18th century for crafting clips and brooches. Today, amethyst stone is still considered a precious stone, and has adorned many precious relics from the past (British Crown, Egyptian crown, Russian crown, etc.).
ametrine stone

Ametrine

Originating from a natural blend of Amethyst and Citrine stone, Ametrine derives its name from these two minerals. The first part of the word ‘Ame’ comes from Amethyst. The second part ‘trine’ comes from citrine.
pierre ammonite

Ammonite

Amazonite stone takes its name from the Amazon River where it was discovered. This green stone was honoured by Amazonian warriors and symbolises courage. However, some studies refute this analysis as it is likely that amazonite never existed in this river and it was simply a confusion with another mineral.

Andalusite

Originally named « red-violet adamandin feldspar », this mineral was discovered in 1789, on granite rock samples from Imbert, located near Montbrison in the Forez region, by a French mineralogist and crystallographer named Jacques Louis de Bournon. In 1798, Jean-Claude Delamétherie, an 18th-century French naturalist, mineralogist, geologist and paleontologist, believed that the samples came from Andalusia in southern Spain.

Angelite

In lithotherapy, angelite (or angel stone) eis a mineral belonging to the anhydrites family. In 1804, the German mineralogist Abraham Gottlob Werner chose its name to highlight the composition of the stone. Drawing his inspiration from the Greek term anhudros which literally means “without water”, he insisted on the absence of water in angelite’s chemical formula.

Antimony

Antimony stone takes its name from two ancient Greek words. One is “anti” which can be translated as “opposite of”, and the other is, “monos” meaning “alone”. This origin is further confirmed by ancient beliefs that such a metal never occurs alone. However, purists of the ancient Greek language regularly point out that the term “anti” actually has various translations depending on the context (opposite, in exchange, in turn, equivalent to, against, and many other meanings!).
apatite stone

Apatite

Apatite is a stone that comes in many shapes and colours. Many confuse it with topaz, beryl and olivine. This type of stone sometimes takes the form of tourmalines and other calcines. It is difficult to recognise due to its resemblance to a large variety of stones.

Apophyllite

In 1806, the mineralogist René Just Hauy first called this group of minerals « apophyllite », which comes from the Greek word apophyllos (« which disintegrates into strips »). This means that the stone, once heated, rubbed, or brought into contact with acid, dries out and separates into strips.
aquamarine stone

Aquamarine

Aquamarine stone, renowned for its marvellous beauty and beautiful blue colour, has been used in litho therapy for several centuries by a large number of different civilisations. It offers numerous virtues and has a positive impact on our health as much as on our mood and brain, both physically, intellectually and psychologically.
aragonite stone

Aragonite

Aragonite was discovered by Anselmus Boëtius de Boodt in 1609. This renowned mineralogist then gave it the name ‘stillatitius lapis’. Its natural form resembles a bouquet of flowers with varying white, blue, green or brown spikes later earning it the nickname ‘flowers of iron’.

Auralite 23

The formation of auralite 23 is believed to date back about 1.2 billion years ago, when oxygen appeared in the atmosphere and multicellular species began to develop. The appearance of this stone would be the result of the collision of meteorites, when they struck amethyst deposits during the Meso-proterozoic period.
aventurine stone

Aventurine

Although this natural mineral has been around for a long time, the name “aventurine stone” has only recently been attributed to it, in reference to “Murano glass”. It is a synthetic crystal, which resembles the natural stone. The most known story comes from around the year 1700, when the glassmakers of Venice, Italy, experienced a mass exodus to the small island of Murano.
azurite stone

Azurite

Azurite stone’s name comes from the Persian “lazhward” area and means “blue,” referring to the azure beauty of this mineral. Used in the design of various blue pigments and for its “mystical” characteristics, azure stone was renowned in Ancient Egypt. The Wadi Magharah mine was the oldest, operating nearly 5000 years before Christ.

Azurite-Malachite

Azurite has been known for more than 4,500 years, and traces of azurite powder have even been found in Egyptian jars used to make ointments. From that time, the stone was already being powdered to make blue pigments for artistic purposes.

Beryl

Beryl stone has been known since ancient times. Its name was first mentioned in the year A.D. 77 in Pliny’s Natural History. Etymologically, the Latin name “beryllus”, is derived from the ancient Greek “beryllos”, literally translated “colour of sea water”. In ancient Rome, this stone was used to make certain objects, such as magnifying glasses.
bismuth-rough-stone

Bismuth

Bismuth was identified and described by the chemist Claude Geoffroy Le Jeune, in 1753. However, the stone was already known in some European regions and in France. In 1814, It was attributed its chemical symbol, Bi, by the Swedish chemist Berzelius. Bi has always been considered as a stable element, deprived from toxic properties.
pierre obsidienne noire

Black Obsidian

In Prehistory, this volcanic stone was used for making weapons and cutting tools. Due to its hardness, black obsidian was fashioned into blades. This was particularly the case in pre-Columbian America. The pebbles that were tumbled were utilised to create jewellery. In the Neolithic period, a trade and transportation of stones were established from Italy, proving that they were found in abundance in southern Europe.
black tourmaline stone

Black Tourmaline

Arriving on French territory in 1703, black tourmaline stone was first documented by Buffon in 1759. During this period, emperors and kings had vast quantities of black tourmaline. From the 1800s onwards, black tourmaline stone was widely used and exploited in jewellery.

Blende

Derived from the Greek name “sphaleros” which means “treacherous”, due to the possibility of confusing it with galena, Blende stone has been mentioned many times: in 1546 (Georgius Agricola), in 1747 (Wallerius), in 1782 (Torbern Olof Bergman). It was then described in 1847 by the German mineralogist Ernst Friedrich Glocker.

Blood Jasper

Long considered to be the most beautiful variety of Jasper, Blood Jasper stone is also known as Heliotrope Jasper or Blood Stone. It is a stone whose colour varies from black to dark green. It is decorated with dots that can be yellow, white, but more generally red.

Blood

Bloodstone, or heliotrope, is a deep green, earthy mineral with red spots. During Antiquity, this gem was much sought after and highly appreciated as it was considered the most beautiful gem.
pierre apatite bleue

Blue Apatite

Apatite has many varieties of different shades such as blue, green, yellow… Blue and green apatite are the most common varieties while the yellow one is rare. Blue apatite was discovered quite recently and no legends and historical use have been associated with it. Pedro Francisco Davila was the first naturalist to publish a book about blue apatite in 1767, which describes the stone as a “phosphoric” one.
pierre calcite bleue

Blue Calcite

Calcite takes its name from the Latin and Greek words “Calcis” and “Khalx”, both meaning “lime”. The stone has been used since the ancient times according to experts. The Egyptians used it to make small decorative objects such as figurines and statuettes. Throughout the eras, the stone has been known as “limestone spath”, “androdamas”, “drewite”, or “aphrite”. Legends associated it with magical practices and witchcraft as it was believed to be used by spellcasters.
pierre calcédoine bleue

Blue Chalcedony

Blue chalcedony has been exploited since Neolithic times for the crafting of tools. Some of these creations were discovered in France, in Quimperlé, in Brittany. Since 4000 B.C., the Babylonians and the Assyrians made seals out of the stone to protect their precious documents and belongings. Moreover, the mineral was known to make its owner benefit from its powerful energy.
pierre saphir bleu

Blue Sapphire

Blue sapphire is a precious stone like ruby, diamond and emerald. The stone can take on almost any shade such as yellow, green, transparent, white or pink, but it is mainly known for its blue hues. Similar to ruby and diamond, the price of blue sapphire is determined by the 4 Cs (Carat, Cut, Clarity and Colour).

Bronzite

Bronzite stone finds its origin in the Greco-Latin world, under the name of enstatite, a term inspired by the Greek « enstates », which means «opponent». It takes its name from its particular colour, resembling bronze. The Romans believed in the therapeutic and protective power of bronzite.
pierre oeil de boeuf

Bull’s Eye

Bull’s eye derives its name from its special shimmering appearance. Already present in Ancient Greece, it was associated with the Minotaur’s gaze. This connection with the son of Minos, imprisoned in the labyrinth of Daedalus, confers the stone an aura of physical power, impetuosity and a certain ferocity. Roman legionaries took it with them to battle in the form of a talisman.
bull's eye stone

Bull’s Eye

According to Indian beliefs, bull’s eye stone offers success in trade and also longevity. It can treat asthma, sore throats and inflammation. Indians wore bull’s eye pendants to better communicate with the parallel world. This stone also represents the last flicker of hope when things fall apart.
calcite stone

Calcite

Existing since antiquity, calcite stone is a mineral species that has been thoroughly researched since the 17th century. However, it was not studied as an economic mineral, but rather for its optical qualities. It began with the discovery of birefringent Iceland Spar (a transparent variety of calcite crystals) by Danish Rasmus Bartholin in 1669.
carnelian stone

Carnelian

The origin of the word carnelian is rather unclear. For some, the word comes from the Greek ‘carneolus’ meaning of a flesh appearance. For others, the word refers to the fruits that grow on dogwoods, the cornel. The origin of the fruit’s name is itself derived from the Latin word ‘corneolus’ which refers to the hardness of the fruit’s stone.

Cat’s Eye Chrysoberyl

Cat’s Eye Chrysoberyl, formerly known as « cymophane » meaning waving light, was first described by the German geologist and mineralogist Abraham Gottlob Werner in 1790 as krisoberil meaning golden beryl which comes from « berullos » (beryl) » and « khrusos » (gold).

Cavansite

The chemical composition of cavansite stone is easy to remember: the first syllable, ca, refers to calcium, van to vanadium and site to silicon. Deposits of this rock have been found in India, New Zealand, and Brazil, but it was discovered in 1960 in the United States, in the state of Oregon, by a couple on a hike.
pierre obsidienne oeil céleste

Celestial Eye Obsidian

Archaeological excavations have shown that celestial eye obsidian was used by ancient peoples. It is very sharp and hard, hard enough to scratch glass. This stone served as a natural material for fashioning antique weapons and tools for ceremonial purposes.
celestine stone

Celestine

Celestine has its origins in Madagascar. This stone was discovered in 1797 by Martin Heinrich Klaproth, a German chemist and mineralogist. The following year, in 1798, the stone was christened Celestine by Abraham Gottlob Werner, a German geologist and mineralogist. Notably, he established a classification system and an inventory of all minerals and stones.
chalcedony stone

Chalcedony

Discovered in Asia Minor (Turkey) in 4000 BC, chalcedony stone takes its name from the ancient port of the city of Kalkêdôn (Chalcedon), due to its numerous deposits. During this period, Babylonians and Assyrians used this stone for crafting tools or to create cylinder seals for protecting texts.

Chalcopyrite

Identified in 1725 by Henckel, chalcopyrite stone takes its name from the Greek word “Chalco”, which describes pyrite and copper. However, if you study its structure, you can see that it looks rather like sphalerite. For large deposits, you should know that they come from a hydrothermal origin.
charoite stone

Charoite

Found in a single region of Russia, charoite is deemed a rare stone. It takes its name from the Chara River, located in the Aldan massif in Russia, a range of peaks that are 800 to 1,000 m high on average. The word ‘chary’ means ‘charm’ or ‘magic’ in Russian.
chrysanthenum stone

Chrysanthemum

Chrysanthemum rock, also termed xenotime, is a precious mineral, highly prized in Japanese and Asian culture. Indeed, it stands out strongly by its aesthetic and decorative aspects. It has existed for around 250 million years.
chrysocolla stone

Chrysocolla

It is written that Cleopatra wore chrysocolla stone in her travels for its calming virtues. This mineral was actually discovered in Antiquity and was described by Theophrastus, Greek philosopher and a disciple of Aristotle, in his treatise ‘On Stones’ published in 315 BC.

Chrysolite

Rocks are not only useful for geologists or architects. They can also be very useful in medicine. Lithotherapy is the branch that consists of treating health issues using the vibrations of rocks. Chrysolite is a rock with a very exciting history. Its origins go back several centuries before Christ. It has a special reputation that gives it a special place in the treatment of many ills.
chrysoprase stone

Chrysoprase

A gem often used for its many virtues, chrysoprase stone is considered a love stone and is associated with the heart chakra. It is a natural remedy against insomnia and was used to detect poison, making this a very versatile stone. Whether you are interested in its energetic virtues or simply its aesthetics, here is everything you need to know about chrysoprase stone and its virtues.

Cinnabar

For thousands of years, the intense red of the grain of cinnabar stone (mineral) captivated people who found many uses for it, such as the creation of artistic works or medicinal substances. It is a rare stone, used in alchemy, which gave it various properties, and therefore different uses.
citrine stone

Citrine

Rocks are not only useful for geologists or architects. They can also be very useful in medicine. Lithotherapy is the branch that consists of treating health issues using the vibrations of rocks. Chrysolite is a rock with a very exciting history. Its origins go back several centuries before Christ. It has a special reputation that gives it a special place in the treatment of many ills.
pierre conglomérat

Conglomerate

Conglomerate is a detrital rock. In other words, it has been created from the breakdown of other rocks. These pieces of rock have been cemented together naturally. To claim to have belonged to a rock, the discernible piece must be larger than 2mm. Conglomerates are thought to be sedimentary in nature, but it is not excluded that they may be of active volcanic origin.
copper stone

Copper

Copper has been appreciated and widely used since its discovery. Its name, Aes Cyprium, comes from Cyprus as this island is one of the major sources. Copper is particularly renowned for its durability. The ancients represented it with a symbol meaning “for life,” due to its anti-corrosion abilities and for its ability to alloy with other metals, creating brass, a mixture of copper and zinc, and bronze, a mixture of copper and tin.

Coral

Theophrastus, Aristotle’s successor, was the first to take an interest in coral stone which he considered to be a petrified plant. Until the 17th century, the stone is perceived as a strange underwater shrub whose milky sap was observed in 1613 by a gentleman from Lyon.

Cordierite

First of all, the history of this rock goes back to antiquity. Although there is no explicit information dealing with it, it would seem to have been used by the faithful in the worship of Athena, the Greek goddess of War and Wisdom. It would then have been used by the Vikings to orient them when the sky was overcast.
pierre corindon

Corundum

The famous mineralogist John Woodward first described this mineral in 1725 as corinvindum. This name is derived from kurund, the Hindi name for the mineral, which in turn originates from the Tamil term kuruntam, meaning red stone. Throughout history, many personalities have been fascinated by the beauty of these minerals. Louis XIV, who had an undisguised taste for anything blue, chose one as one of the main pieces for the crown jewels.

Cyanite

As most stones, cyanite stone has different names, the most famous being cyanite (or kyanite) and disthène. The first was given by Abraham Gottlob in 1789. It comes from the Greek “kyanos” (meaning blue, from which the word “cyan” is also derived).

Desert rose stone

This stone’s origin is related to the legend of a sultan nicknamed “Ben” who searched for the gates of the sand palace. Ben has been walking for days in the desert, under a blazing sun. Thirsty and exhausted, he ends up in the middle of a sandstorm that makes him lose consciousness.
diamond stone

Diamond

Historically, the first diamonds were extracted 3,000 years ago in India. As they are only extracted from alluvial deposits (found on riverbanks), and because of their great beauty and extraordinary resistance, diamonds are an important symbol in many cultures.

Diopside

Tashmarin is a light green chromiferous stone that originally comes from the Uyghur region in Xinjiang province, more precisely from the Tien-Shan Mountains (literally meaning : « Celestial Mountains »). Tashmarin has a less saturated colouration because of its lower chromium concentration.
dioptase stone

Dioptase

The first dioptases arrived in the West from the Kyrgyz steppes. Its first study took place in the late 18th century on Kazakhstan mine specimens. German mineralogist Moritz Rudolph Ferber was the first to study this mineral closely. However, he misclassified it as an emerald stone due to its emerald green.
dolomite stone

Dolomite

This stone is of a glassy appearance, and usually consists of a beautiful mix of colours that gives it its unique patterns. It can be found in grey, white, red, light pink and even yellow-brown.
pierrre dumortierite

Dumortierite

Born in the Lyon region in 1801, Eugène Dumortier, a renowned palaeontologist, is the one who gave his name to dumortierite stone. Before being discovered by the palaeontologist and called dumortierite, this mineral had already been found and was known to the world of mineral specialists.

Eclogite

Eclogite stone is a metamorphic rock formed in facies having undergone certain temperatures and pressure conditions. Its name was given by Abbot Haüy in 1822 and comes from the Greek word « eklogê ». Eskola is defined as metamorphic facies on rocks from basic protoliths.
emerald stone

Emerald

The etymology of the word emerald is unclear. To Littré, this term came from Sanskrit. Others considered it a word of Persian origin. By distortion, these terms created the Latin word smaragdus, meaning ‘heart of stone.’

Enstatite

Coming from the Greek enstates meaning « opponent », enstatite stone, first described in 1855 by Gustav Adolf Kenngott, a German mineralogist, takes its name from its infusibility (its resistance to the action of fire), a name recognized by the IMA (International Mineralogical Association).

Epidote

Originally, epidote stone was discovered by René Just Haüt in 1801. It comes from the Greek name “episodis”, which means increase or addition. It was discovered in 1874 in the southern United States, in the Unaka Mountains from which its name is also derived.
pierre-oeil-de-sainte-lucie

Eye of Saint Lucia

The Eye of Saint Lucia stone’s history begins with a legend that appeared in the 4th century: Lucy, a young girl of nobility, thanks to her many prayers to the Virgin Mary, managed to procure the miraculous recovery of her mother who was suffering from an incurable disease. They prayed for healing at the tomb of St. Agatha.
pierre feldspath

Feldspar

Since Antiquity, the important reference is Georgius Agricola who managed to describe fluorite accurately. The term “fluorite” appeared later with the naturalist Napione. Its Latin origin is “fluere” which means melting. It is common to see it called fluorite, calcium fluorite and fluorine. Popular throughout the world, the stone gave rise to the word “fluorescence” that we all know.

Fire Opal

Fire opal is a mineral considered as a precious stone, with a very particular dimension for the Roman civilization. Its origin would come from the Sanskrit name “upala”, then was nicknamed Pandora or Empress, in honour of the fire opal called the “fire of Troy”, in homage to the gift received by Empress Josephine from Napoleon I.

Flint

This is the object that automatically comes to mind when we think about Prehistory! The reason is that it is an exceptional piece of our history. It gave birth to the first tools about 2.3 million years ago. It is an extremely weatherproof stone often found in the form of pebbles, slabs or very thick flags along streams and beaches.
pierre fluorine

Fluorine

Since Antiquity, the important reference is Georgius Agricola who managed to describe fluorite accurately. The term “fluorite” appeared later with the naturalist Napione. Its Latin origin is “fluere” which means melting. It is common to see it called fluorite, calcium fluorite and fluorine. Popular throughout the world, the stone gave rise to the word “fluorescence” that we all know.
fluorite stone

Fluorite

Fluorite stone is a very ancient crystal that is reputed to be the most colourful of all. It reflects the entire colour spectrum. It is certainly for this reason that it has always been attributed numerous virtues. It’s powerful effects on physical and psychological well-being have been noted.

Fuchsite

Fuchsite stone belongs to the Muscovite family, which derives from the Latin translation of “vitrum muscoviticum” (Moscow glass). This name was used as early as 1794 by Johann Gottfried Schmeisser (1767-1837), a German pharmacist and mineralogist, in his book “Mineralogical System”.
pierre gabbro

Gabbro

Galena stone eis exploited in several localities of La Calestienne, which have become very famous over the years. This is the case of Matagne-La-Grande, Matagne-La-Petite, Treignes, Villers-en-Fagne. Some early miners spent a lifetime of hard work in shafts to extract them.

Galena

Galena stone eis exploited in several localities of La Calestienne, which have become very famous over the years. This is the case of Matagne-La-Grande, Matagne-La-Petite, Treignes, Villers-en-Fagne. Some early miners spent a lifetime of hard work in shafts to extract them.
garnet stone

Garnet

Used for millennia and over the centuries in jewellery, garnet stone once bore the name ‘Red gem’, from the Latin ‘malum granatum’, a grain fruit closely resembling the colour of pomegranate. The Romans named it ‘carbuncle’, meaning ‘little spark’. Its presence in various religious texts demonstrates the importance of the garnet Stone’s symbolism: in the Bible it is a lantern to enlighten Noah in the midst of darkness and the term ‘little spark’ is used in the evocation of the fourth heaven in the Koran.
pierre pépite d'or

Gold Nugget

In 1839, the German-born Swiss merchant Johann August Sutter moved to California and established an agricultural complex on the most fertile hills of the Sacramento Valley. As his farm grew, Sutter decided to build a sawmill in 1848.

Graphite

Better known in mining language as rock salt, halite stone has its etymological root in the Greek words hals and lithos, meaning respectively salt and stone. It is the result of the evaporation of salty seas and lakes during the geological periods of the Triassic, more than two hundred million years ago, and the Oligocene, thirty-three to twenty-three million years ago.
pierre aventurine verte

Green Aventurine

The stone takes its name from the Latin word “adventura” which is used to talk about a future event. It also refers to the word “advenire”, literally meaning “to happen”. Green aventurine is therefore associated with new adventures and new discoveries. The stone also has a rich history, worth knowing.

Halite

Better known in mining language as rock salt, halite stone has its etymological root in the Greek words hals and lithos, meaning respectively salt and stone. It is the result of the evaporation of salty seas and lakes during the geological periods of the Triassic, more than two hundred million years ago, and the Oligocene, thirty-three to twenty-three million years ago.
hawk's eye stone

Hawk’s Eye

Based on its symbol, falcon’s eye stone represents the omniscient guardian angel. In Ireland, Celtics believed that hawk eye was an amulet allowing the wearer to evolve methodically.

Heliodore

It takes its name from the Greek “helios”, which means sun, with respect to its beautiful golden-yellow colour, for the prettiest specimens, the others being rather orange and even having a green glow. It was discovered in Namibia in 1910 in the same rocks (pegmatites) where aquamarines were found.

Heliolite

Heliolite stone owes its name to its sparkling effect that recalls the colour of the sun (helios in ancient Greek). It was so named in 1801 by Jean-Claude Delamétherie, a French geologist and mineralogist.
heliotrope stone

Heliotrope

Heliotrope stone takes its name from the Greek words ‘helios’ and ‘trepeini’ meaning ‘sun’ and ‘turn’ respectively. It is also commonly referred to as ‘blood jasper’ and ‘blood stone.’ Heliotrope is a mixture of crystallised chalcedony, quartz and iron.
hematite stone

Hematite

Etymologically derived from the Latin ‘hematites’ (blood), hematite stone is also commonly called hematitogelite, oligiste, Iron mica and anhydroferrite. At the time, hematite stone was primarily used as a red powder during the Upper Palaeolithic period and later by homo-sapiens as a pigment for cave paintings.

Hemimorphite

Originally from Baïta Bihorului, in Bihor County, Romania, hemimorphite stone is a zinc silicate. The main deposits of this crystal are located in the United States, Mexico, Congo, Madagascar, Australia, China and Europe (France, Switzerland, Austria, and Italy).

Hessonite

Hypersthene is a common name derived from ancient Greek. Etymologically, “hyper” means “over”. Sthenos refers to strength, power and endurance. Since 1988, the IMA (International Mineralogical Association) has discredited this name.
howlite stone

Howlite

Discovered by Henry How (1828–1879) in 1868, howlite stone is a semi-precious stone that was found in a gypsum quarry near Windsor, Canada. During drilling and extraction, the miners reported this unknown stone to chemist, mineralogist and geologist Henry How.

Hyacinth zircon

Formed at the same time as the Earth, hyacinth zircon stone is one of the oldest formed precious minerals. It has been known and used since the dawn of time. Despite the fact that it is very old, there is not much information, myths or legends about this gem.
pierre hypersthene

Hypersthene

Hypersthene is a common name derived from ancient Greek. Etymologically, “hyper” means “over”. Sthenos refers to strength, power and endurance. Since 1988, the IMA (International Mineralogical Association) has discredited this name.
iolite cordierite stone

Iolite

Iolite, or cordierite, is a stone that belongs to the silicate family. It contains high quantities of magnesium, silicate and aluminium. It is a photo-reactive rock that cannot be dissolved in water or acid and is fire-resistant.
jade stone

Jade

Jade stone takes its name from the Spanish phrase ‘piedra de ijada’ (loin stone), given to it by Spanish conquistadors at the beginning of the 15th century. From the Latin ‘lapis nephriticus’, jade and nephrite signify the ’flank or kidney area’ in relation to their kidney healing virtues.
jasper stone

Jasper

From the Greek ‘iaspis’ and the Latin ‘jaspidem’, Jasper stone means speckled or spotted stone. In prehistoric times, this stone was used for crafting tools. In France, jasper tools are still being unearthed in Britanny and Fontmaure.
jet stone

Jet

From the Labrador region in Canada, Labradorite stone was discovered by Moravian missionaries in 1770 who were working with Aboriginal peoples, including the Inuit. They were tasked with evangelising them.

Kunzite

George Frederick Kunz will discover in 1902 a stone hitherto unknown that he decided to name Kunzite. It was during his research in California that he made this incredible discovery. Kunz was passionate about gems at a very young age. He carried out a lot of work leading to the discovery of a new gem, Kunzite stone.

Kyanite

Lepidolite stone is highly valued in lithotherapy. It is highly recommended to learn about its origin and history to better understand the importance people attach to it. Symbolising calmness, serenity and concentration, it offers physical and psychological advantages.
labradorite stone

Labradorite

From the Labrador region in Canada, Labradorite stone was discovered by Moravian missionaries in 1770 who were working with Aboriginal peoples, including the Inuit. They were tasked with evangelising them.

Landscape Jasper

Landscape Jasper stone is distinguished by its brown colour, which can show superimposed or intertwined striations of different tones. Landscape jasper is also called picture jasper, scenic jasper or Kalahari Desert jasper because of its sandy colour which suggests ancient landscapes.

Lapis Lazuli

Even in prehistoric times, lapis lazuli stone was used for adornments but also jewellery. Among its symbolism, lapis lazuli stone represents health, nobility, luck, elegance and purity.
larimar stone

Larimar

Larimar stone, or Atlantis rock, is one of the most sought-after pectolites around the globe. It was first noted in the Dominican Republic in 1916 by Father Domingo Fuertes of Loren. It was he who, without success, suggested the extraction of the mine that contained it.
larvikite stone

Larvikite

Formed between 300 and 295 million years before Christ, that is, at the beginning of the Permian period, larvikite stone was at the origin of the Oslo region’s formation during the breakup of Pangea.

Lava

Since the dawn of time, people have been fascinated and feared by volcanic manifestations. They symbolise the power of the world, the fragility of the human condition in the face of the elements.

Lepidolite

Lepidolite stone is highly valued in lithotherapy. It is highly recommended to learn about its origin and history to better understand the importance people attach to it. Symbolising calmness, serenity and concentration, it offers physical and psychological advantages.
pierre lingam

Lingam

Its name comes from the old English word “slinkan”. According to the philosopher Jozef Schmidt, these words makes an appeal to variation in size. That is to say, the shrinking and swelling found in slugs or snails, but also in the human genitalia. Moreover, in Slavic languages, the word lingam is often used in expressions involving slugs.
magnesite stone

Magnesite

In 1808, German mathematician Dietrich Ludwig Gustav Karsten (1768–1810) was the first to describe magnesite (formula MgCO3).

Magnetite

Known since the Iron Age, magnetite stone was first mentioned in 77. That is the first trace of this stone. In 1845, Wilhem Karl Ritter von Haidinger described it. Its name comes from Mount Magnetos in Greece which houses a great number of this stone.
malachite stone

Malachite

During antiquity, Malachite stone was reduced to powder and was used in various iconographic paintings. The metallic pigment of which it is made up of has a very high sensitivity to acids as well as to light.
pierre marbre

Marble

Marble was named resplendent stone for its light by the Greeks. Characterised by its very firm and dense rock, it was used very early on for the art of sculpture. Used by the most meticulous masters, marble was for a long time confused with other minerals intended for sculpture. The material was used to create funerary idols as early as the civilisation of the Cyclades. In the Neolithic era, in the 3rd millennium BC, the Cycladic idol (a statuette) spread throughout the Aegean islands.
pierre marcassite

Marcasite

Dubbed “the gold of fools”, it has a metallic lustre reminiscent of gold. Its name comes from the word “marqachita” in ancient Arabic, a word later derived from “marchasita” (Medieval Latin), which at the time referred to all pyrite minerals. If it was once possible to confuse it with the precious metal, this is no longer the case today.

Meteorite

Muscovite is the most common natural stone of the mica family. Described in 1850 by the mineralogist James Wight Dana, it is composed mainly of potassium and aluminium. Its name comes from its use in Russia, where it was used instead of glass in certain fields, hence “Moscow glass” (translated from vitrum muscoviticum).
pierre mica

Mica

Muscovite is the most common natural stone of the mica family. Described in 1850 by the mineralogist James Wight Dana, it is composed mainly of potassium and aluminium. Its name comes from its use in Russia, where it was used instead of glass in certain fields, hence “Moscow glass” (translated from vitrum muscoviticum).

Milky Quartz

In order to understand the origin of this stone, we should first look at the notion and definition of the word crystal. The term would come from the ancient Greek « Krystallos » and « Kryos », which mean respectively « ice » and « frost ». Ancient beliefs indicate that it was formed after a significant drop in temperature.

Mokaïte

In Aboriginal language, the word “mookaïte” means “white water”. Mokaite stone was named after Mooka Creek, the place where it was discovered. This mineral is known by various names such as: Windalia radiolarite, mookite, mookalite, mookerite, moakite, moukalite and Moukaite.

Moldavite stone

Moldavite stone is a rock resulting from the impact between a meteorite and the earth’s atmosphere, which occurred about 12 million years ago in Moravia. However, the origin of this asteroid and the time it spent in space before colliding with the Earth have not been determined.
moonstone

Moonstone

The history of moonstone is very important when one knows the attraction and fascination of the moon for ancestors. Indeed, they saw great resemblance of moonstone to moonlight.
morganite stone

Morganite

Throughout the prehistoric period, obsidian stone was used to craft tools and weapons. This igneous rock has existed for over 36,000 years. Still exploited by some Indian peoples, Obsidian is a stone that served the first peoples in their development.

Moss Agate

In many cultures and civilizations, Moss Agate stone is a sign of soil fertility. Bringing good omens, close to nature, it extends its great generosity to the earth. This closeness to breeding ground is probably due to the crystallization of moss, its particular, fibrous and vegetal veining. It is the friend of gardeners and farmers. The great Athena owes its stability and balance to Moss Agate.

Nacre

Nephrite stone is a rock, one of the three called jade, along with jadeite and kosmochlor: these three minerals have long been mixed up as they have similar appearance and properties, although their chemical composition is not the same.

Native Gold

Gold is a chemical element with the symbol Au and atomic number 79. Its symbol corresponds to the first two letters of the Latin word “aurum”. Native gold Native gold is considered to be a precious or noble stone, with a “golden yellow” colour.

Native Sulphur

Spectrolite stone is a rare variety of labradorite. It was discovered by Moravian missionaries in 1770 while travelling through the Labrador Region in Canada. They were responsible for the evangelization of certain peoples in the region, such as the Inuit. Local myths and legends tell of a great Inuit warrior who once speared a rock.

Nephrite

Nephrite stone is a rock, one of the three called jade, along with jadeite and kosmochlor: these three minerals have long been mixed up as they have similar appearance and properties, although their chemical composition is not the same.
obsidian stone

Obsidian

Throughout the prehistoric period, obsidian stone was used to craft tools and weapons. This igneous rock has existed for over 36,000 years. Still exploited by some Indian peoples, Obsidian is a stone that served the first peoples in their development.

Olivine

Olivine stone is a mineral belonging to the silicate group. Finding its origin around 1500 BC, and called “peridot”, it is very present in ancient Egypt. It is the main element of the mother rock “Peridotite”.
onyx stone

Onyx

Researchers discovered bowls in Egypt carved entirely from onyx dating back to the second dynasty. In Crete, during the Minoan period, sardonyx was frequently used, particularly in the Palace of Cnossos.
opal stone

Opal

Its history goes beyond that of Man and extends throughout our planet. From the Sanskrit ‘Upala’ meaning precious stone, the Latin ‘Opalus’, and the Greek ‘Opallios’, its name means ‘of changing colour’
pierre orgonite

Orgonite

In the early 1940s, Wilhelm Reich referred to the existence of a vital energy emitted by orgone that would be a real source of vitality. It was only after his death that various studies on this mysterious energy were carried out by a great number of scientists and supporters.

Pearl

Appearing for the first time during Prehistory, it was during certain excavations on Palaeolithic tombs that Pearl Stone could be observed for the first time, not as a piece of jewellery or a necklace. The stone was sewn directly onto clothing with various shells.
peridot stone

Peridot

This stone of distant origins and strangely miraculous virtues holds an excellent reputation. Discover the fascinating story of this sublime vibrant yellow and olive gem.
silicified petrified wood stone

Petrified Wood

The literal translation of petrified wood is ‘wood turned into stone’ as it takes its name from the Greek petro, meaning ‘stone’. As such, the study of this wood that transcends the ages is carried out in geology, but also in palaeobotany as well as in the study of palaeoenvironments.
pietersite stone

Pietersite

Discovered in 1962, this mineral is composed of a mixture of falcon’s eye, tiger’s eye, and crocidolite. It is named after Sidney Pieters, the man who discovered it. An amphibole very similar to Pietersite can be naturally found In China’s Hunan Region.
pink tourmaline stone

Pink Tourmaline

According to ancient Egyptian legend, tourmalines are stones that came from the centre of the Earth on a long journey that took them through a rainbow. This story would explain the fact that the tourmaline family is one of the most colourful and with the most variety.
porphyry stone

Porphyry

Porphyry is available in different colours. Nevertheless, the purple one is mostly known and historically raised it to its actual prestige. During Pharaonic Egypt times, it would seem that it was unused and unknown. That said, other similar stones were used in Predynastic Egypt for making vases, but it would seem that this ceased afterwards.
Pierre Préhnite

Prehnite

White quartz, also known as “milky quartz”, has always been particularly appreciated by jewellers. Since the 19th century, there has been a great demand for this stone. For instance, fortune-tellers used crystal balls. In addition, white quartz symbolised eternity throughout Antiquity.
pierre-purpurite

Purpurite

White quartz, also known as “milky quartz”, has always been particularly appreciated by jewellers. Since the 19th century, there has been a great demand for this stone. For instance, fortune-tellers used crystal balls. In addition, white quartz symbolised eternity throughout Antiquity.
pyrite stone

Pyrite

Pyrite Stone takes its name from the Greek ‘pyr’ meaning fire. This designation alludes to the sparks it produces when iron is struck on itself. The Greek Dioscoride named it thus in year 50 AD.

Quartz stone

White quartz, also known as “milky quartz”, has always been particularly appreciated by jewellers. Since the 19th century, there has been a great demand for this stone. For instance, fortune-tellers used crystal balls. In addition, white quartz symbolised eternity throughout Antiquity.

Red Jasper

There are many varieties of jasper that have been used throughout human history. This mineral has been used to decorate and ornament sculptures, vases, pavements, fireplaces, and many other objects. Once polished or cut, it is used as a gem to decorate jewellery such as bracelets or necklaces.
rhodochrosite stone

Rhodochrosite

Discovered in the 13th century in Argentina during the pre-Columbian era, this stone takes its name from the ancient Greek ‘rhodon’ meaning pink and khroma meaning colour.
rhodonite stone

Rhodonite

In 1500 BC, Mycenaeans (An Aegean Civilisation of the Helladic period in Greece) were already beginning to carve and sculpt rock crystal stone. Indeed, a rock crystal stone cup is housed at Athens museum from this period.

Rhyolite

An age-old exploited mineral, the history and traditional use of rhyolite stone are however little known. Rhyolite belongs to the group of granites, magmatic plutonic rocks with a grained texture, rich in quartz, potassium feldspars (orthoses), plagioclases and micas (biotites or muscovites).
rock crystal stone

Rock Crystal

In 1500 BC, Mycenaeans (An Aegean Civilisation of the Helladic period in Greece) were already beginning to carve and sculpt rock crystal stone. Indeed, a rock crystal stone cup is housed at Athens museum from this period.
rose quartz stone

Rose Quartz

Rose quartz stone holds an intimate relationship with love and with the heart. During the Bronze Age, Middle Eastern civilisations advocated the goddess of fertility, war and love Asherah, with rose quartz.

Rubellite

Rubellite stone, its Latin name meaning « reddish », is actually a variety of pink tourmaline. According to an ancestral legend from Egypt, they came out of the epicentre of the Earth and, during their long ascent, they crossed a rainbow of colours, depositing on them the variety of colours specific to this type of gem.
ruby stone

Ruby

Its name comes from the Latin ‘Ruber’, the etymological root of ‘Red’. Before the development of scientific gemology in the 18th century, many reddish gems were incorrectly identified.

Rutile Quartz

In 1803, Abraham Gottlob Werner, a German mineralogist and geologist, first described Rutile, whose name is derived from the Latin « Rutilus », meaning red. Indeed, some specimens are characterized by an intense red colour due to the titanium that composes it.

Sapphire

The word sapphire comes from the Greek “sappheiros” meaning “blue.” Greeks and Romans used sapphires from Sri Lanka in fifth century B.C. Egyptians worshipped and regarded sapphire stone as sacred and as a bearer of justice and truth whilst Persians believed that the blue of the sky was the result of its reflections.

Selenite

This beautiful translucent stone takes its softly pronounced name from Greek mythology. Daughter of the two titans Hyperion, the light god, and his sister Theia, the goddess Selene was the lunar goddess and embodied kindness, goodness and benevolence.

Septaria

Also called « Chlorite jade » because of its green colour, seraphinite stone is a strangely beautiful mineral of the chlorite family. This extraordinary stone was only recently discovered by a renowned Russian mineralogist and crystallographer: Nikolai Ivanovich Koksharov (1818-1892).

Seraphinite

Also called « Chlorite jade » because of its green colour, seraphinite stone is a strangely beautiful mineral of the chlorite family. This extraordinary stone was only recently discovered by a renowned Russian mineralogist and crystallographer: Nikolai Ivanovich Koksharov (1818-1892).
serpentine stone

Serpentine

Also called ophite or ophiolite, serpentine stone is often difficult to identify as it comes in many colours and varieties: it is commonly found in olive but also exists in red, light green, forest green, yellow, black and white.
shungite stone

Shungite

Sunstone has always fascinated throughout the ages. It has been appreciated for many properties related to its warm orange colour. In ancient times, this shiny orange quartz was considered to have magical virtues.

Smoky Quartz

Clairvoyants and fortune-tellers were very inspired by this type of quartz, especially in the 19th century. They have a preference for this stone because, unlike clear rock crystal, smoky quartz stone prevented lay persons from accessing the mysteries of their crystal balls.
sodalite stone

Sodalite

Sunstone has always fascinated throughout the ages. It has been appreciated for many properties related to its warm orange colour. In ancient times, this shiny orange quartz was considered to have magical virtues.

Spectrolite

Spectrolite stone is a rare variety of labradorite. It was discovered by Moravian missionaries in 1770 while travelling through the Labrador Region in Canada. They were responsible for the evangelization of certain peoples in the region, such as the Inuit. Local myths and legends tell of a great Inuit warrior who once speared a rock.

Spinel

This small stone with a pretty red hue, sometimes blue or pink, takes its name from the Latin “spina”, which means “thorn”. Spinel, a term originally created as an epithet for the word “ruby”, is in fact composed of multiple small crystals and has an atypical shape with sharp and sometimes prickly edges and points like thorns.

Staurolite

Jean-Claude Delamétherie, a French mineralogist, first described this stone in 1792 and gave it the name Staurolite, from the Greek σταυρός stauros (« torture stake »). This term even comes from the Indo-European root sta (« stand »). This name was kept as the main choice because of its anteriority when René Just Haüy tried to rename this stone as Staurotide stone.

Steatite

Steatite stone eis a mixture of several minerals. It is also called soapstone or saponite. Its etymology comes from the Latin “steato”, meaning “fat”, and “ite”, meaning mineral. Pliny the Elder is said to have named it during the first century AD for its resemblance to animal fat.

Stibine

The first written record referring to stibine stone dates back to the year 77 in the writings of Pliny the Elder. It was only much later that François Sulpice Beudant introduced the term stibine, based on the Greek « Stibi ».
pierre stonehenge

Stonehenge

Stonehenge is a megalithic monument consisting of several groups of concentric circles. It was erected between 2800 and 1100 BC, from the Neolithic period (beginning of sedentary life, agriculture and cattle breeding) to the Bronze Age.
pierre stromatolite

Stromatolite

These fossilised rocks date back to 3.42 billion years ago, when the moon was closer to Earth (333,150 km for 384,400 km today) and when it rotated faster with days lasting only 18 hours. Due to these two phenomena, tides were higher, with an average tidal range of 25 metres, consequently expanding foreshores.

Sugilite

This mineral has a short history as it was only discovered in the 20th century. Sugilite stone owes its name to Sugi Kenichi (1901-1948) who first described it in 1944. This Japanese geologist and petrologist identified it in an intrusion of aegyrine and syenite located on Iwagi Islet near Kyoto, Japan.
sunstone

Sunstone

Sunstone has always fascinated throughout the ages. It has been appreciated for many properties related to its warm orange colour. In ancient times, this shiny orange quartz was considered to have magical virtues.
tanzanite stone

Tanzanite

As the name suggests, tanzanite takes its name from the country where it was discovered: Tanzania. This country was populated by a nomadic tribe living in the vast plains that stretch to the foot of the well-known dormant volcano, Mount Kilimanjaro. In the 1960s, severe thunderstorms swept across the merelani hills near Kilimanjaro, starting bushfires and causing the Massaï tribe to flee.
tiger's eye stone

Tiger’s Eye

Under the Roman Empire, tiger’s eye stone was used by warriors and soldiers to protect themselves in battle. Later in the Middle Ages, tiger’s eye was worn as a pendant to break spells and ward off evil spirits.
topaz stone

Topaz

Topaz stone is a precious crystal known since antiquity. It is mentioned by authors such as Pliny the Elder as well as in the Bible. It was then associated with Saint Matthew who was given Topaz to illuminate the darkened hearts of his community.
turquoise stone

Turquoise

In 6000 BC, turquoise stone was exploited by the Egyptians for fashion and decoration. This stone was found in the form of bracelets, especially on the arms of mummies. It was also widely used in Persia as a currency for other objects.
unakite stone

Unakite

Discovered in 1874 in southern United States, unakite stone owes its name to the mountains where it was found: the Unaka Mountains. This stone is also known as epidote stone.

Vanadinite

Vanadinite stone, yellow, orange, or transparent, is extremely popular among collectors, especially those from Moroccan deposits. But it can also be worn in jewellery of all types: pendants, necklaces, earrings…
pierre vésuvianite

Vesuvianite

Vesuvianite owes its name to the Vesuvius volcano, which is located in Naples, Italy, where it was first discovered. It was identified in 1795 by the German gemmologist Abraham Gottlob Werner. In 1801, it was named “idocrase”, which means mixed shapes, because this mineral can occur in massive, compact and even granular aspects.
pierre quartz blanc

White Quartz

White quartz, also known as “milky quartz”, has always been particularly appreciated by jewellers. Since the 19th century, there has been a great demand for this stone. For instance, fortune-tellers used crystal balls. In addition, white quartz symbolised eternity throughout Antiquity.
pierre zoïsite

Zoisite

The history of zoisite stone is very recent. This mineral was discovered in the 18th century by the Austrian naturalist and mineralogist Sigmund Zois, Baron von Edelstein, who made his fortune in the iron trade in Ljubljana, the present capital of Slovenia.

Find the stone that really suits you !

As you may have noticed by browsing through the different pages of France Minéraux, there are hundreds of different stones, each with its own aspects and virtues. To help you make your choice, here is a guide that lists the main characteristics of the 213 stones available at France Minéraux. To go further in your learning of lithotherapy, do not hesitate to go to the "Books" category of our shop. You will find encyclopedias, guides, dictionaries and small paperbacks to help you discover the meaning of stones.

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